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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 128 (some duplicates have been removed)
near the museum and the california academy of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30
of sciences opened in 2008, it quickly became one of the top tourist magnets in the city. part of the cal academies' astronomical success is the weekly nightlife party. >> i am joined by helen, who is here to school me on all the nocturnal activities that are getting ready to take place here. tell us a little about what we can expect to see at nightlife. >> we open up the doors every thursday night at the california academy of sciences. there are certain things you can see every week you can go to the museum, visit the planetarium, and we bring in bars and a deejay or band. it is a different feel from during the day, something different every week. tonight , we have beer and music. -- tonight we have great beer and music. it is beer week. we have a dozen local brewers in african hall. we have a deejays to set up throughout the museum and a live performance at 9:00 p.m. tonight. >> what has been your favorite part as a participant or as an observer? >> my favorite part is to walk around the aquarium in to see people with a drink in their hands, getting to know maybe somebody new, may be lo
a group of political science students from san jose state who watched the debate together last night downtown. after it was all over, even some of the president's biggest supporters in the room, yeah, they had to admit, romney gets the slight edge. >> overall, romney from my perspective did a little bit better. he wasn't as specific as obama, but he set out to attack obama more. >> a political science professor from san jose state telling us, she thinks romney will get a nice bump in the polls from that debate. she adds whether that bumps come in the all-important swing states where the race is still very tight that, remains to be seen. >>> here's a question, historically how much impact do presidential debates have on an election when it's all said and done? we asked that question to a professor of political science at santa clara university. >> that's a good question. in 2004, john kerry won the first debate against president bush. and in 1984, reagan stumbled in the first debate against mondale and it didn't seem to hurt them very much. it will be interesting to see as the polls c
sciences and biotech discoveries. -- vio lifbio life scientists ad biotech discoveries. u2 -- for making that a cause for future generations and we will discover in that corridor those live science drugs that will help us end these dreadful diseases for generations to come. thank you, lieutenant governor. [applause] i wanted to welcome the delegates who come here under the leadership of the vice minister and of course in his capacity as not only the vice ministry of commerce, but also the china investment and promotion agencies and to the many companies are here in attendance, you represent that cross-section of companies from diverse backgrounds and discipline throughout the bay area. i want to welcome you here to this great seminar to wish you a great conversation and an intelligent one, and one that hopefully will discuss the many more ways that we can not only do business, but to work together to solve the world's problems. this is what happens here in san francisco. we cannot just talk about the problems. we will try to discover ways to solve them. this is, i think, the essence of w
is the birthplace as mayor lee was saying of life science, biotech, the home of the california stem cell institute, a state with more engineers, more scientists, more global -- nobel laureate's than any other state or we still lay claim to five of the top universities based on the shanghai index in the world. caltech, stanford university, and three of our public universities, not least of which the university is a stone's throw away. uc-berkeley campus. we're proud of the state but we also recognize we have challenges and we need to lean into the world we're living in. this today is an example of leading in and i am grateful to all of you for your participation. and vice minister, we are honored to have you out here in our state in this wonderful city and we look forward to many visits over many years. thank you very much. [applause] >> thank you, lieutenant governor. of course, the best for last. the hon. vice minister of commerce to the podium, please. [applause] >> lt. governor newsom, mayor lee, counsel general, ladies and gentlemen, good morning. it is a great pleasure for me to be here to at
the arts and sciences. there is luther burbank and jack london. there was a thing on the side. it says federal art project and has beginning and ending date. that is a wall which becomes a tomb stone. the artists themselves are becoming ghosts. that's what he's doing there. joseph danish. head of the projects, it is it was a wonderful time that he woke up every morning wondering how long it would last. they were being paid to produce public art. well, what happened of course is the war. the war came along. and roosevelt could see it coming. so, very few people understand the new deal segways into war. they beefed up the military bases like fort mason. my 1943, they are all killed. the war did what the new deal couldn't do, full employment. there were reports, it's still with mind numbing statistic. we have to rely on other people to do it. the these projects enriched the lives of millions of people and does so today all the time. i have become aware of it, but very few people are. i have also become aware extraordinary people. here's a dedication of roosevelt. on the left, who painted
it to have our public policy be guided less about compromise and more about science. [applause] and buy accurate public policy analysis, studies that show things like what are the awards reaped from investment in public funding of contraception? what do we gain from that? what are the consequences if we do not? it has been disappointing to see the ways in which science has been pushed out of so much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming in for services, frequently abortion services, that are based on untrue science. that is a scary moment. regardless of how you feel about abortion and your personal or legal beliefs, to require medical professionals to mislead their patience is not where we should be as a country. those type of scientific facts and accurate analyses should be given much more credence in our political and government process than our ideology. [applause] >> i think it is fair to ask this question. i received some e-mails from constituents and others who sa
are three key ethical -- the first one is this. i do not think that there is any legitimate basis in science, medicine, or any ethical code that i know of or the bible, for that matter for our criminal law tdistinguishing between those wo have alcohol and tobacco and people who put other substances in their body. there is no legitimate basis for distinguishing between the alcoholic on the one hand under criminal law and between the drug addict on the other. that is first. the second ethical point is i hope most of you agree with this. i do not believe that anybody should be punished simply for what we put into our own bodies absent harm to others. nobody deserves to be punished for what we put in our bodies absent harm to others. hurt somebody, yes and not tell me your addiction was the excuse. we need to be regarded as sovereign over our minds and bodies. the criminal law should not be treating anyone as a criminal for what we put in here. when one is trying to pursue a particular public health or public safety objective, reducing the harm of drugs or whatever it might be. and when you have
. located near the museum and the california academy of sciences, shakespeares garden was designed in 1928 by the california spring blossom association. flowers and plants played an important part in shakespeares literary masterpieces. here is an enchanting and tranquil garden tucked away along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. appreciate the beauty of its unique setting. the cherry tree, the brick walkways, the enchanting stones, the rustic sundial. chaired the bards'w ro -- share the bard's words. the garden is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, enjoy the sunshine and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare float you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. shakespeares garden is 8ada accessible. this park is located at the bottom of a hill. it is a secret garden with an infinite and captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, one block from the bottom of lombard street, it makes the top of our list for the most intimate picnic settings. avoid a
. >> if i had to pick someone to win and become a spokesperson for what is best about science and biomedical science it would be him. >> reporter: i asked the doctor how he is going to celebrate. he said he's probably going to have a beer. the love for medicine runs in his family, his wife is a dermatologist and their two doctors are both in medical school. amy hollyfield, abc7 news. >>> much more still ahead. developing news in a meningitis outbreak linked to contaminated medicine, the rise in the number of cases. >>> battle between wedding caught on video. the wild fight that ended with the death of one man. >>> federal health officials say the number of confirmed meningitis cases from contaminated steroid shots has risen to 105, death toll from 7 to 8. the drugs were sent to four clinics here in california. t.j. winick reports the drugs are being recalled. >> reporter: the pharmacy the at the center of the meningitis out brach has announced voluntary recall of every product -- it makes saying this action is being taken out of abundance of caution. one of those sickened was janet russell o
had to pick someone to win and become a spokesperson for what is best about science and biomedical science it would be him. >> reporter: i asked the doctor how he is going to celebrate. he said he's probably going to have a beer. the love for medicine runs in his family, his wife is a dermatologist and their two doctors are both in medical school. amy hollyfield, abc7 news. >>> much more still ahead. developing news in a meningitis outbreak linked to contaminated medicine, the rise in the number of cases. >>> battle between wedding caught on video. the wild fight that ended with the death of one ron: years ago i made a promise to provide the best for my family, in sickness and in health. carol and i needed help figuring out what's covered by medicare and what's not. so we turned to the same folks we've relied on for health insurance all these years. announcer: ron and carol called anthem blue cross and found an affordable medicare plan that pays for some costs original medicare won't. now they can keep making memories for years to come. choose from plans offering protection from hi
will be an interesting day, full of cutting edge issues. gang violence and brain science and crime, these are issues at the forefront and deserve all of our attention. this is a greatat>> your going p with me because i liked to wander around and see faces. you have learned more about me that a lot of people know. for the last 10 years i have been married to someone who was a deputy chief of the lapd and i now refer to him as being in recovery. at the same time, i have been working extensively with home with industries, and my brother said, if he had dreamed i would be married to a policeman and working with a priest, somebody would be lying. i have been working with gangs and been involved with gangs, trying to figure them out for 34 years. i began as a young social worker in south los angeles. with gang infested housing projects that are now almost mythic, jordan downs and nickerson gardens, and i worked in these projects during what is referred to as the decade of death, when crack and unregulated gun availability laid waste to communities of color. in los angeles during the late 1980's and early
. >> there is science now we didn't have before. that sexual orientation is not something that can be changed. >> but the victory may be short lived and there are groups that already claim it's unconstitutional violating first amendment. >> this is absolutely clamps down on speech by professionals involved and also affects the minors and their parents rights to access types of therapies they may want. >> legal groups also argue conversion therapy does work for people. >> when this benefits people, and may or may not benefit other people there is no basis for the state to step in. >> this is among the darkest times of my life? >> did it work? >> no. i am just as gay as i ever was. >> other states will be interested in seeing how this case plays out. they, too are considering the ban autos there is a busy weekend ahead. there a look at options this weekend. >> and there is a killer whale in sea world with a injury what. trainers say could have caused this massive wound. >> and this is the rover seeing unusually have you heard of the new dialing procedure for the 408 and 669 area codes? no, what
year laboratory science and third year math. we know this class 2014 right now, 20% of them are on track not to graduate, those with d's or betters, and if we raise that to c's or better, we might be looking at 30 rs. the first graduating class will have to graduate a through g is now entering their junior year. we know they're hitting now -- >> 2014 is the class -- >> the class, right. they will be heading junior year next year. sequentially classes get much more rigorous. and that third year math, which has been a gatekeeper to the students in los angeles will no longer be a gatekeeper to our students too. we could be looking at 40% of our graduating class not getting high school diplomas. now, while i know furlough dres are horrible to everybody, especially horrible to our students but also to our labor partners. we also at the board have a great responsibility to graduate every student ready for cleverages. and actually where we are now, this 2014 and 2015 class, if this is any indication of where we might be in 2014, 2015, we will not be in a good place once those stude
of political science students. the president's own staff tonight said romney won the debate when it came to style points gop the students there agree? >> for the most part, yes, they do agree. about 120 political sciences students came here to watch the debate along with some professors and some alumni. the general consensus was romney had a slight edge over the president in terms of his performance at the debate tonight. >> two rebuild america. >> more effective. more charismatic. >> i will lower taxes on middle income families. >> governor romney held his own. actually, i was surprised. >> reporter: after the debate was over, even some of the president's biggest supporters in the room felt that romney had won. >> romney did a great job in presenting himself in like a very positive way. even though, like, the answers that obama gave were very pro democratic, pro public education. >> overall, romney, from my perspective, did a little bit better. he wasn't as specific as obama, but he set out to attack obama more. >> this way it's his do or die moment. >> reporter: melinda jackson says ro
. and our motto is where science meets community. our team does really cutting edge research on different kinds of prevention strategies, pre-exposure prophylaxis. and if you go to our website, join prep hiv, you'll see all of the many exciting studies that we have as well as our partnership with san francisco city clinic in launching the first demonstration project of pre-exposure prophylaxis, taking antihiv medicines to prevent new infections. we're studying topical gels, retro microbicide. the way we're going to end this epidemic is through a vaccine, we've controlled other infectious diseases through a cure. we're proud of our staff who contribute to this as well as the many study participants. and i'm just going to close with a quick word about the project. the way that this project came about was actually one of our staff members, janey vincent who is our graphic designer, you'll see some of her beautiful work inside, noticed that there was -- she's hiding. (applause) >> she noticed that president obama had designated part of his stimulus money to nih for the national institutes of
request for an interview. >> up next remarkable science behind creating a human heart. >> and there i >>> findings of a study out of uc berkeley are raising concerns about the chemical known as bpa showing mothers with high levels had less active thoi roids and the thyroids of newborn boys were more active. there is no impact found among newborn girls and this is commonly found in other containers and in the lining of food and beverage can autos people understand how easy to break a heart but how about making one? there is a group of researchers developed a blueprint they say could have a profound affect. >> through a microscope there is no mistaking beating. these heart cells were created in a bay area lab and have helped researchers unlock secrets of how a heart becomes a heart it helps to know what switches exist how they're connected and what they turn on or shut off. >> so this team set out to map the genetic switches locked inside of the dna of embryonic stem cells to see how it becomes a hearts cell. >> this is setting right switches to turn genes on or off. >> to begin, the re
science in represent the students in political science program also. i"x 7 talk to students, they tao me on everything. i say wow you -- in san francisco state university and also in the the citycÑábnd l supervisor in here i want just let yo»sf> know about the peopln here, just go out of the area in the city,.r50ñ go to universityd also talk to the people in here, immigrant people, they have a become society. very important because the common u.s. for democracy just and please÷1 just -- ross because -- >> president chiu: thank you thanks. next speaker. >> good afternoon,/ hello, san francisco. my name is paul courier, and it's an:blq honor and privilegeo show up in the room of the people, in room 250 at our building, city hall. some of the supervisors know that i filed formal ethics charges against you on october 3. there are seven of you. and you know i filed formal ethics charges for obstruction of justice. that's a felony, i'll remind you, and perjury. you signed your sunshine srgss certifications. you said you read the sunshine ordinance and understood it and you shut sunshine d
some of the spider's we see here on display. >> at the california academy of sciences, there is a very large collection of preserved and live specimens, which are the evidence about evolution. we have the assassin spiders, which are spiders that exclusively kill and eat other spiders. they are under the microscope here. research done and the california academy's i rhinology lab suggests that the assassin spiders have been doing this for over 150 million years. this glassed in room is a real scientific laboratory, and the people in that room are preparing specimens of vertebrate, that is mammals and birds. the way they do this is to remove the skin, sew it together in a relatively lifelike pose, and ensure that it does not decompose. >> i am a really big class actress fan, so i am here to see them, and beer week. >> i wanted to learn something and have fun. >> i always enjoy it. i am not all is well -- always working as i am tonight. sometimes i come to enjoy the music and to dance. ♪ >> culturewire covers the arts in san francisco, and one of my favorite culture artists is here tonig
our police resources wisely or not using science to guide where to use our police resources. we need to look at our transportation system and revolutionize that. that will improve a lot of things, public health, public safety, commerce. so we need to be looking with a vision for the future about what we want our city to be. and i think i have done that before and like i said, i'm for prevention. and i'm for looking to the future and figuring out how we can sculpt a better san francisco and that is what i will do as supervisor. thank you, mr. davis. i want to remind folks and point out that we have seen a disturbing trend in san francisco over the past couple ever years. of years. we have had a lot of leadership appointed for us. an appointed mayor, appointed district attorney when our leaders are chosen for us instead of by us. if you want leadership in our city, i'll i'm your candidate. at juliandavis.org, there is more detail about the grassroots campaign we're building. i encourage you to look where the candidates are getting their money from. i think it says a lot about whose i
them one by one disappear. >> this is sort of a merger between art and science and advocacy in a funny way getting people to wake unand realize what is going on -- wake up and realize what is going on. so it is a memborial trying to get us to interpret history and look to the past. they have always been about lacking at the past so we proceed forward and maybe don't commit the same mistakes. >> here we are at the embarcadero. we are standing at one of locations for the street artists. can you tell me about this particular location, the program? >> this location is very significant. this was the very first and only location granted by the board of supervisors for the street artist when the program began in 1972. how does a person become a street artist? there are two major tenants. you must make the work yourself and you must sell the work yourself. a street artist, the license, then submitting the work to a committee of artists. this committee actually watches them make the work in front of them so that we can verify that it is all their own work. >> what happened during the holiday to
golden gate park. the museum and the academy of sciences and so many other institutions. but also, a lot of community arts centers. there is all these community arts space is that i just love, and it makes our neighborhoods a much more colorful and livable as well. >> what motivated your interest in politics? >> i guess i have always been passionate about civil rights and equality for everyone, and i have a 10-year-old daughter, so having a girl has made me much more sensitive to gender equality and other issues, but i guess i have always been someone that is vocal about my politics, but as a supervisor, and having to listen to many perspectives before making key decisions. as an activist in chinatown, i have always felt that working families and people who work in our neighborhoods need to have much more support. it is always about giving more voice to immigrants or the underserved and workers in the city. that is what drives my passion as a supervisor. >> tell me about the process of running for supervisor. what did you learn from the campaign process? was anything surprising? supervis
acting unusually and all bats. under scoring treatment can save lives. health and science editor, john fowler, ktvu news, back to you. >>> new cases in the allegations of a teacher for failing report malstation reports. notes taken by the principal were made public yesterday. santa clara county officials say the documents reveal the principal had enough information to get the teacher, chandler, from his althoughed victim to report possible allegations three months before she did. she waited until chandler was accused of molesting another child to report him. >> obviously we believe the notes are the most compelling evidence that we have of the student reporting the situation. >> now, we tried contacting the attorney for the principal but have not heard back. they take the allegation seriously and cooperating fulliy with law enforcement. >>> investigators are looking into what caused a car crash that killed a driver today. it happened before 11:00 from interstate 880 to highway 237. the driver of the toyota crashed into a concrete divider and the car burst into flames. the driver died a
people work on that project thus far. the rebuilding of the academy of science in golden gate park. the rebuilding of our public hospital laguna honda this is on going work with the same contract ors that move successful apprentices from one project to another and keep them working for several years. the construction workers of the future to be the superintendents the construction owners. that's the perfect thing there. that's success.
is science given at grades five, eight and ten. you see the same double digit trend with the district moving from 51.2 to 51.6. and as i said when we look we have three lenses in which we look at these scores. the first is over time. the second is movement. looking at the same group of students that took the test two years in a row and how did they move in their proficiency level? so we had matched scores for 30,000 students. and when they began the year last year they came in at 60.4 percent proficiency and by the end of the year 62.7 or 63% of them were profishtd. looking at all the proficiency levels and how students moved we found the movement to be around 16.6 percent or 70% to round it which means seven out of every ten students either remained profirkt or advanced or moved up one level. okay. i'm going to repeat that. seven out of every ten students either remained proficient and advanced or moved up a level. in math we found the movement to be at 73% and this was similar to what we saw in [inaudible]. as i said the third lens by which we look at these scores are acceleratio
science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the stage by a student, not from usf, but from san francisco state. we actually talk to each other. this is mackenna. >> good morning. >> finally, i am joined by alicia from the independent living center in san francisco. it is great for all of you to be here today. people will be trickling in over the next half hour. we will give you a taste of what wii is like. we have set up the game. i will start by playing mackeena in a game of tennis. the interesting thing about wii is we use this little remote. just by moving our arms, we can control movement on the screen. you will be watching up on the big screen as we play a game of tennis. are you ready? all right. we will select two players. that is me. does that look like me? it kind of those -- of does. does that look like mackenna? that is not by chance. you can make the person look like anything you want. they can even look like aliens. interesting. we are going to play some great tennis today. ok. one thing to tell you
will share the award with haroche of france. the rile academy of sciences says they opened the door to new experiments in quantum physics. >>> a look at the weather and see where that rain is out there. >> depends on where you are it could be anywhere with it being closest to the coast that would be a better area to see scattered light showers during morning hours. let's look at what is going on the embarcadero san francisco back to the bay bridge looks quiet. live doppler 7 hd, this is what it looks like right now and let me flatten this out a little, as i do, you will be able to see how close it is to the coast. about 17 mile there is as we head toward -- 15 to 17 miles -- we'll put it into motion, it is dissipating as it heads north, the chunk of low pressure starting to move more towards northwest which means good sign that most of this activity is going to stay well out over the ocean. don't be surprised if a spray sprinkle or two gets along the sonoma marin county coast this morning. we are running in the 40s napa, santa rosa everybody else in the 50s. thick fog north bay valleys. mo
-- nobel prize in physics. he is originally from sacramento and received a bachelor of science from uc berkeley. he's now a physicist at the university of colorado in boulder. both judges credit them for inventing ground-breaking methods to observe the properties of quantum parols while preserving their quantum properties. >>> ahead closer look at why investors are feeling down on wall street. >>> and what happened late this morning for an amazing jump from the edge of space. >>> stocks are down after global economic growth and poor expectations for corporate earnings seasons with kicks off after the closing bell. dow down 98, nasdaq down 45, s&p down 12. >>> high winds today derailed plans for an man to launch a death defying 23-mile free fall in new mexico. former military parachutist baumgartner is on a quest to become the first sky diver to break the sound barrier. he planned to ride a capsule carried bay balloon into the stats fear then jump. but the balloon is so delicate it can only take flight of winds of two miles an hour or less. the 43-year-old now says he will try again. >>
the first human rabies death in 20 years. our health and science center tells us how a single bat could have put dozens of people all over the world at risk. >>> it happened somewhere in south contracosta county. colonies of mexican free tail bats.. >> once symptoms develop it's fatal. >> after a bite the incubation phase is 2 to 6 months. >> the unidentified 34-year-old man was outside with friends who had found a bat quote flopping on the ground. one of them had the bat in a plastic bag. >> the i can't who died of rabys went over and stuck his hand in the bag and most likely was bitten. . >> he never reported the bite in march. took civilian work in iraq and became infectious. he flew home to kran traffic costa june 14th. four days later to bangkok for vacation. flew back to work in iraq. worsened. flew to dubai for treatment . >> there were 59 people who were identified and 23 of those people internationally received post exposure. >> the man's family also got shots. they urge people to avoid all contact with wild animals acting usually and all bats. immediate treatment can save lives. he
details tonight about the first human rabies death in 20 years. our health and science center tells us how a single bat could have put dozens of people all over the world at risk. >>> it happened somewhere in south contracosta county. colonies of mexican free tail bats.. >> once symptoms develop it's fatal. >> after a bite the incubation phase is 2 to 6 months. >> the unidentified 34-year-old man was outside with friends who had found a bat quote flopping on the ground. one of them had the bat in a plastic bag. >> the i can't who died of rabys went over and stuck his hand in the bag and most likely was bitten. . >> he never reported the bite in march. took civilian work in iraq and became infectious. he flew home to kran traffic costa june 14th. four days later to bangkok for vacation. flew back to work in iraq. worsened. flew to dubai for treatment . >> there were 59 people who were identified and 23 of those people internationally received post exposure. >> the man's family also got shots. they urge people to avoid all contact with wild animals acting usually and all bats. immediate trea
could have a profound affect on how we treat heart disease. health and eye yens report -- and science reporter carolyn johnson has the story jie. even through a microscope there is no mistaking the rythmic beating. these cells were created in a bay area lab, and they helped researchers unlock the secrets of how a heart becomes a heart. >> it helps to have a blueprint to know what switches exist, how they are connected and would they turn on or shut off? >> so his team at san francisco's gladstone institute set out to map the genetic switches locked in the dna of embreonic stem cells to see how a stem cell becomes a heart cell. >> so these modifications are setting the right switches to turn genes on or off so that a heart cell in this case gains its heart identity. >> jeffrey alexzander coaxed the stem cells from mice to beating heart cells. the process done in a petri dish is growth factors that mimics the environment. it is not always a precise science. >> you know, my weekends sometimes would hinge on whether i came in and sold beating cells or not. >> wons they had enough of the b
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 128 (some duplicates have been removed)